HUD award more than $75M in CARES Act relief funds to New Jersey

ESSEX COUNTY, NJ — United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson announced the allocation of the remaining $1.988 billion in CARES Act funding for the Community Development Block Grant program, according to a Sept. 21 press release. The allocation focuses funds toward places with households facing higher risk of eviction. To date, HUD has provided nearly $5 billion in CDBG funding nationwide to help communities combat the coronavirus and alleviate economic hardship. In total, New Jersey communities will receive $75,728,585.

Essex County will receive $2,570,479. Additionally, Bloomfield will receive $388,629, East Orange will receive $761,481, Irvington will receive $651,239, Newark will receive $3,500,308. 

“The Trump administration has maintained that no one should risk losing their home due to the coronavirus,” Carson said. “We’ve taken several actions since the beginning of this pandemic to keep Americans in their homes. Today, we announce additional aid to the communities that need it the most. These funds can help households struggling to meet their rental or mortgage obligations to stay afloat as our nation continues to recover from the coronavirus pandemic.”

“The president and Secretary Carson continue to prioritize low-income communities disproportionately impacted by the coronavirus. Over $75 million in CDBG funding will be made available to New Jersey to help residents who face a higher risk of eviction,” said Lynne Patton, HUD regional administrator for New York and New Jersey. “To date, over $306 million has been made available to New Jersey to ensure cities across the Garden state are able to combat the coronavirus.”

These funds can be used to provide temporary financial assistance to meet rental obligations for up to six months. The funds are focused toward places with households facing higher risk of eviction, specifically communities with high rates of individuals in industries with high job loss in states with high unemployment; communities with high rates of businesses in industries with high job loss in states with high unemployment; and concentrations of those most at risk for transmission and risk of eviction, with higher amounts for states with high rates of coronavirus.

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